The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture - Vol. 14

By Glenn Hinson; William Ferris | Go to book overview

Folklife

VOLUME 14

GLENN HINSON & WILLIAM FERRIS
Volume Editors

Sponsored by
THE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN CULTURE
at the University of Mississippi
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS
Chapel Hill

-v-

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The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture - Vol. 14
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • General Introduction xi
  • Introduction xvii
  • Folklife 1
  • Aesthetics, African American 27
  • Aesthetics, Historically White 30
  • Basketmaking 35
  • Bluegrass 38
  • Blues 43
  • Cajun Music 49
  • Car Culture 54
  • Cemeteries 58
  • Children’s Folklore 64
  • Country Music 68
  • Deathlore 74
  • Family Folklore 77
  • Family Reunions 81
  • Fishing, Coastal 84
  • Folk Arts and Crafts 89
  • Folk Medicine 92
  • Foodways 97
  • Funerals 102
  • Gardening 105
  • Gospel Music, African American 110
  • Gospel Music, White 115
  • Grave Markers 121
  • Hip-Hop 127
  • Houses and Barns 132
  • Hunting 137
  • Hunting Dogs 142
  • Legends 148
  • Mardi Gras Celebrations 152
  • Musical Instruments 157
  • Música Tejana 163
  • Needlework 169
  • Occupational Folklife 174
  • Old-Time String Band Music 179
  • Opries 183
  • Picking Sessions 187
  • Pottery 193
  • Powwows 196
  • Public Folklife Programs 200
  • Quilting, African American 203
  • Quilting, Historically White 209
  • Religious Folklife 215
  • Rootwork (Hoodoo, Conjure) 221
  • Stepping 227
  • Stories of Personal Experience 232
  • Storytelling 236
  • Voodoo 241
  • Wood Carving 244
  • Zydeco 247
  • Bar and Bat Mitzvahs 253
  • Barbecue 254
  • Basketmaking, Lowcountry 256
  • Basketmaking, Native American 259
  • Bluegrass Festivals 264
  • Buckdancing, Flatfooting, and Clogging 265
  • Church Dramas 268
  • Cockfighting 270
  • Coon Hounds 273
  • Dancing, American Indian Traditions 275
  • Decoration Day 278
  • Decoy Carving 281
  • Dinner on the Grounds 283
  • Dogtrot House 285
  • Easter Rock 288
  • Face Jugs 290
  • Fiddle Contests 291
  • First Monday Trades Days 293
  • Ghost Stories 296
  • Ginseng Hunting 298
  • Gourd Martin Houses 300
  • Gumbo 302
  • House Parties 304
  • Jack Tales 307
  • John the Conqueror Root 309
  • Juke Joints 311
  • Line Dancing 313
  • Los Matachines 315
  • Lowriders 318
  • Marching Bands, Hbcu 320
  • Marching Bands, New Orleans 323
  • Mardi Gras Indians 325
  • Moonshining 328
  • Mules 331
  • Outbuildings 334
  • Porch Sitting 336
  • Pottery, Alabama 338
  • Pottery, American Indian 340
  • Pottery, Georgia 343
  • Pottery, North Carolina 345
  • Proverbs 348
  • Quartets, African American 351
  • Quinceañeras 353
  • Ring Shouts 356
  • Roadside Memorials 358
  • Rolley Hole Marbles 360
  • Shotgun House 362
  • Shout Bands 364
  • Smokehouse 366
  • Southern Soul Music 367
  • Square Dancing 369
  • Talking out Fire 370
  • Traders 372
  • Two-Stepping 374
  • Walking Sticks 376
  • Womanless Weddings 379
  • Index of Contributors 383
  • Index 385
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