The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra

By Marvin Rosenberg; Mary Rosenberg | Go to book overview

Act IV, Scenes x, xi, xii, and xiii

Shakespeare now moves quickly to his climaxes. One brief moment of Anthony’s apprehensions of the next battle; one even briefer moment of Caesar anticipating it; then a few lines and Anthony is defeated, desperate.

Act 4, scene 10. Enter Anthony and Scarus, with their Army, ready for the battle.

Anthony: Their preparation is today by sea,
  We please them not by land.
Scarus: For both, my lord.

The audience, shadowed by the death of Enobarbus, and warned by the failure at Actium, might well expect from Scarus his earlier arguments against fighting at sea, especially considering what he will say privately about Anthony’s fleet in 4.12.3–9. Instead, what is heard now is only Anthony’s mixture of challenge and caution—“valiant and dejected,” Scarus will call his manner. Well might Anthony be worried: Shakespeare makes his whole future hang on what happens today.

Anthony: I would they’d fight i’th’fire! or i’th’air!
  We’d fight there too! But this it is, our foot
  Upon the hills adjoining to the city
  Shall stay with us—order for sea is given;
  They have put forth the haven—
  Where their appointment we may best discover
  And look on their endeavour.

Exeunt.
Enter Caesar, and his Army.

Act 4, scene 11. This is a buffer scene, reminding us of Caesar, now playing a waiting game, ominously for Anthony.

Caesar: But being charged, we will be still by land,
  Which as I tak’t we shall, for his best force
  Is forth to man his galleys. To the vales!
  And hold our best advantage!

-352-

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The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Acknowledgments 17
  • Introduction 21
  • Act One 39
  • Act I, Scene I 41
  • Anthony 70
  • Cleopatra 80
  • Act I, Scene II 86
  • Act I, Scene III 104
  • Octavius 118
  • Act I, Scene IV 123
  • Act I, Scene V 133
  • Act Two 143
  • Act II, Scene I 145
  • Act II, Scene II 151
  • Act 2, Scene III 174
  • Act II, Scene IV 180
  • Act II, Scene V 181
  • Act 2, Scene VI 197
  • Act II, Scene VII 207
  • Act Three 225
  • Act III, Scene I 227
  • Act III, Scene II 231
  • Act III, Scene III 239
  • Act III, Scene IV 246
  • Act III, Scene V 251
  • Act III, Scene VI 254
  • Act III, Scene VII 262
  • Act III, Scenes VIII, IX, and X 272
  • Act III, Scene XI 278
  • Act III, Scene XII 288
  • Act III, Scene XIII 293
  • Act Four 315
  • Act IV, Scene I 317
  • Act IV, Scene II 320
  • Act IV, Scene III 326
  • Act IV, Scene IV 329
  • Act IV, Scene V 335
  • Act IV, Scene VI 337
  • Act IV, Scene VII 341
  • Act IV, Scene VIII 344
  • Act IV, Scene IX 349
  • Act IV, Scenes X, XI, XII, and XIII 352
  • Act IV, Scene XIV 362
  • Act IV, Scene XV 379
  • Act Five 393
  • Act V, Scene I 395
  • Act V, Scene II 403
  • Is Anthony and Cleopatra a Tragedy? 473
  • Epilogue 480
  • A Note on the Historical Cleopatra 69 Bc–30 BC 482
  • Critical and Theatrical Bibliographies 489
  • Critical Bibliography 491
  • Theatrical Bibliography 532
  • Index 597
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