The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra

By Marvin Rosenberg; Mary Rosenberg | Go to book overview

Critical Bibliography

This section includes books and articles about the play; editions, biographies, and reminiscences of and about the various actors and actresses who have attempted the two major roles; and Marvin’s personal letters and conversations with his friends and fellow scholars.

Other similar (selective) bibliographies—including books, critical essays, film and stage productions, and theatrical reviews—can be found in “Antony and Cleopatra”: Shakespeare in Production, edited by Richard Madelaine; “Antony and Cleopatra” on the English Stage, by Margaret Lamb; Agrégation Externe 2002. Shakespeare: “Anthony [sic] and Cleopatra.” Bibliographie Selective etablie par Pierre Iselin (Paris IV: Sorbonne)—available on the Web; and, most exhaustively, in “Antony and Cleopatra”: An Annotated Bibliography, edited by Yashdip S. Bains.

All these have been most helpful to me in checking details on Marvin’s list.

Adelman, Janet. The Common Liar: An Essay on “Antony and Cleopatra.” New Haven: Yale University Press, 1973.

———. Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare’s Plays: “Hamletto “The Tempest.” New York: Routledge, 1992.

Adler, Doris. “The Unlacing of Cleopatra.” Theatre Journal 34, no. 4 (1982): 451–66.

Agate, James. Brief Chronicles. London: Jonathan Cape, 1943.

Aldus, Paul J. “The Analogical Probability in Shakespeare’s Plays.” Shakespeare Quarterly 6, no. 4 (1955): 397–414.

Alexander, Catherine M. S., and Stanley Wells, eds. Shakespeare and Race. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Allen, Michael. “No Mean City.” In KM 80: A Birthday Album for Kenneth Muir, Tuesday 5 May 1987. Private circulation by Liverpool University Press, n.d.

Allen, Shirley S. Samuel Phelps and Sadler’s Wells Theatre. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1971.

Alvis, John Edward. “Unity of Subject in Shakespeare’s Roman Plays.” Publications of the Arkansas Philological Association 3, no. 3 (1977): 68–75.

———. “The Religion of Eros: A Re-Interpretation of Antony and Cleopatra.” Renascence: Essays on Value in Literature 30, no. 4 (1978): 185–98.

Anand, S. “East West Encounter: Nuances of Eroticism in Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra.” In Erotics in Sanskrit and English Literature 1, with special reference to Kalidasa and Shakespeare, edited by Sushma Kulshreshtha. Kalidasa Academy of Sanskrit Music and Fine

-491-

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The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Acknowledgments 17
  • Introduction 21
  • Act One 39
  • Act I, Scene I 41
  • Anthony 70
  • Cleopatra 80
  • Act I, Scene II 86
  • Act I, Scene III 104
  • Octavius 118
  • Act I, Scene IV 123
  • Act I, Scene V 133
  • Act Two 143
  • Act II, Scene I 145
  • Act II, Scene II 151
  • Act 2, Scene III 174
  • Act II, Scene IV 180
  • Act II, Scene V 181
  • Act 2, Scene VI 197
  • Act II, Scene VII 207
  • Act Three 225
  • Act III, Scene I 227
  • Act III, Scene II 231
  • Act III, Scene III 239
  • Act III, Scene IV 246
  • Act III, Scene V 251
  • Act III, Scene VI 254
  • Act III, Scene VII 262
  • Act III, Scenes VIII, IX, and X 272
  • Act III, Scene XI 278
  • Act III, Scene XII 288
  • Act III, Scene XIII 293
  • Act Four 315
  • Act IV, Scene I 317
  • Act IV, Scene II 320
  • Act IV, Scene III 326
  • Act IV, Scene IV 329
  • Act IV, Scene V 335
  • Act IV, Scene VI 337
  • Act IV, Scene VII 341
  • Act IV, Scene VIII 344
  • Act IV, Scene IX 349
  • Act IV, Scenes X, XI, XII, and XIII 352
  • Act IV, Scene XIV 362
  • Act IV, Scene XV 379
  • Act Five 393
  • Act V, Scene I 395
  • Act V, Scene II 403
  • Is Anthony and Cleopatra a Tragedy? 473
  • Epilogue 480
  • A Note on the Historical Cleopatra 69 Bc–30 BC 482
  • Critical and Theatrical Bibliographies 489
  • Critical Bibliography 491
  • Theatrical Bibliography 532
  • Index 597
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