America and Americans in Australia

By David Mosler; Bob Catley | Go to book overview

Preface

In September 1971, after one week in Australia, I sat in an interview with the Anglican cleric Headmaster of a most prestigious Adelaide private school. The interview had, I believed, gone well, and with a Master’s Degree in History and a nearly completed Ph. D. in European History, I expected to have a reasonable chance of securing a job teaching history in this secondary college. My expectations were to gain a tertiary position, but this would do for the time being. However, the Headmaster, to my consternation, after acknowledging my qualifications as more than respectable, began to make discouraging noises about “there’s the sports, you see,” by which he meant that I was unfamiliar with the Australian Rules and Rugby codes of football in which I was apparently to be involved in some form or another. My background in American football (up to university level in what I learned was called “gridiron”) was not sufficient, and he would be in touch with me about the position. Thus, in what turned out to be an initial failed employment application (one that, fortunately, did not inflict permanent damage on my academic career), I was given a rather abrupt and not particularly pleasant cross-cultural introduction to Australian cultural values and language and to the expectations the society had for “new Australians.” I was now clearly an “alien” in a foreign culture.

Thus when, twenty years later, I began to investigate the migration of Americans to Australia since World War II, I could happily combine the compelling motivations of personal experiences with intellectual curiosity. I wished to pursue in a systematic academic manner how my fellow Americans had been assimilated into Australian life. Americans, lacking a visible or coherent com-

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America and Americans in Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - The Global Context 1
  • 2 - Australia in Historical Context 8
  • 3 - Modern Australia since World War II 33
  • 4 - Why Do People Migrate? 54
  • 5 - American Migration to Australia- World War II to the 1990s 66
  • 6 - Why Do the Americans Come to Australia? 80
  • 7 - Do the Americans like Australia? 99
  • 8 - Cultural Relations 122
  • 9 - The Australia Americans Don’t like 140
  • 10 - How Do American Migrants Adapt to Australia? 153
  • 11 - Conclusion- the Future 179
  • Appendix 191
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 199
  • About the Authors 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.