America and Americans in Australia

By David Mosler; Bob Catley | Go to book overview

2
Australia in Historical Context

AUSTRALIA: ANOTHER AMERICA?

Although the first European settlement in Australia was a convict colony established at Sydney in 1788, in a striking number of ways America and Australia have traveled parallel historical paths—a fact that has not gone unnoticed from the middle of the nineteenth century down to the present. Both were peripheral colonial Anglo-Saxon cultures with a huge frontier to settle in the nineteenth century; they shared a common linguistic and cultural heritage; neither could avoid the historical record of rather ruthless and brutal treatment of their indigenous peoples, whose state of health and social welfare is still acutely poor; both now have robust and pluralistic dominant political cultures; both now have multicultural societies resulting from mass European and, to a lesser extent, Asian immigration; they have developed a similar post-World War II culture shaped by the social forces of hyperconsumption, suburbanization, and ideological libera] capitalism while sharing a shrinking Asian-Pacific Basin; and the two “cousins” have similar national characters.

In the mid-nineteenth century one observer commented: “the people of this colony [Australia] resemble the Americans in their presumption, arrogance, ignorance and conceit.” Many other travelers in the Empire found British colonials, like Americans, to be brash, crude, egalitarian, materialistic, provincial, and braggarts—a list not unfamiliar to students of the American character. Matthew Arnold once suggested, as commented upon by Richard White, that Australia, rather than America, represented the nadir of cultural debasement. The two nations, therefore, are often lumped together in space and time, and the

-8-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America and Americans in Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - The Global Context 1
  • 2 - Australia in Historical Context 8
  • 3 - Modern Australia since World War II 33
  • 4 - Why Do People Migrate? 54
  • 5 - American Migration to Australia- World War II to the 1990s 66
  • 6 - Why Do the Americans Come to Australia? 80
  • 7 - Do the Americans like Australia? 99
  • 8 - Cultural Relations 122
  • 9 - The Australia Americans Don’t like 140
  • 10 - How Do American Migrants Adapt to Australia? 153
  • 11 - Conclusion- the Future 179
  • Appendix 191
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 199
  • About the Authors 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.