Boccaccio's Fabliaux: Medieval Short Stories and the Function of Reversal

By Katherine A. Brown | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I wish to express my profound gratitude to everyone who has helped me in the course of writing this book. First of all, I would like to thank the late Karl D. Uitti for introducing me to the fabliaux. This book would not have been possible without his guidance. I am especially grateful to Simone Marchesi for his tireless help and feedback, as well as his generosity, kindness, and patience with me. I would also like to extend my sincerest thanks to Sarah Kay, whose support has been invaluable and whose comments have helped me to shape this book beyond what I had imagined possible.

This study has also benefited immensely from the input and help of those who read various parts at various stages and offered their insights, especially François Rigolot, Lionel Gossman, and Léon-François Hoffmann. I would also like to thank the editors and reviewers for their work in producing this book. Additionally, I am grateful for the support and resources of the manuscript division of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, the Skidmore College Faculty Development Committee, and my colleagues, especially Grace Burton.

Finally, I would like to express my deepest gratitude to my friends for their help, especially Thomas Boeve, Lawrence Kritzman, Joyce Lowrie, Ève Morisi, Brian Reilly, and, of course, to my family.

-vii-

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Boccaccio's Fabliaux: Medieval Short Stories and the Function of Reversal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Fabliaux Reversals and la Grue 10
  • 2 - The Fabliaux in Context 46
  • 3 - Medieval Story Collections and Framing Devices 84
  • 4 - Boccaccio’s Fabliaux Transmission and Transformation of the Fabliaux to the Decameron 125
  • Conclusion 163
  • Appendix 169
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 221
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