Killer Tapes and Shattered Screens: Video Spectatorship from VHS to File Sharing

By Caetlin Benson-Allott | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It takes an institution to produce a dissertation; it takes many institutions, innumerable friends, and much of their patience to produce a book.

I am immensely grateful for the support of Cornell University and the amazing advisers I found there. Ellis Hanson taught me about the intense joys of film theory and rigorous feedback. Ellis was not just a chair but a role model and a champion. Amy Villarejo kept asking for more until I figured out how to deliver it; her encouragement and friendship have shown me the kind of professor I want to be. Eric Cheyfitz shared my enthusiasm for low genres, high theory, and the political potential of both. Jonathan Culler generously shared his time and insight; he even agreed to work through Infinite Jest with me against his better judgment. And finally, Masha Raskolnikov was a superlative mentor and confidant. Masha was never part of my dissertation committee, but she was there for every crisis and victory. She still is.

This project was made possible with fellowships from the Graduate School and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program of Cornell University, as well as research grants from Cornell’s Graduate School, American Studies Program, and Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art. While at the University of California, Santa Cruz, I received grant support from the Senate Committee on Faculty Research, along with the feedback and fellowship of the wonderful Film and Media Studies Department. I am especially grateful for the sage counsel and warm friendship of my colleagues Irene Gustafson, Irene Lustzig, and Shelley Stamp. Neda Atanasoski, Mayanthi Fernando, and Megan Moodie-Brasoveaunu also sustained me and my research during my time among the banana slugs. Amelie Hastie took me under her wing and made a professor out of a terrified graduate student. I once told Amelie I would not be here if it were not for her. Neither would this book.

-xi-

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