Killer Tapes and Shattered Screens: Video Spectatorship from VHS to File Sharing

By Caetlin Benson-Allott | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Bruce C. Klopfenstein, “The Diffusion of the VCR in the United States,” in The VCR Age: Home Video and Mass Communication, ed. Mark R. Levy (Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1989), 25.

2. David Grove, Making “Friday the 13th”: The Legend of Camp Blood (Surrey: Fab Press, 2005), 16. Although John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978) finally appeared on NBC in 1981 in a heavily modified form, negotiations to bring the slasher movie to TV had not yet begun when Cunningham conceived and produced Friday the 13th. Thus, it seems unlikely that Friday the 13th’s shattered screen was intended to herald televisual syndication.

3. Toby Miller, “Apparatus Theory: Introduction,” in Film and Theory: An Anthology, ed. Robert Stam and Toby Miller (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2000), 403.

4. Christian Metz, The Imaginary Signifier: Psychoanalysis and the Cinema, trans. Celia Britton, Annwyl Williams, Ben Brewster, and Alfred Guzzetti (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982), 96.

5. Ibid., 95.

6. As Stephen Groening reports, Trans World Airlines commenced “continuous and regular in-flight film programming” in July 1961; Stephen Groening, “Film in Air: Airspace, In-Flight Entertainment, and Nontheatrical Distribution,” The Velvet Light Trap 62 (fall 2008): 6–7.

7. Metz, The Imaginary Signifier, 49.

8. Although she never discusses Friday the 13th from this angle, Carol Clover identifies the slasher movie’s tendency to situate the spectator inside the murderer’s point of view and to send projectiles toward her eyes as part of its “cruel cinema.” Contemporary faux footage horror movies also reinvent this technique and redirect its metacinematic commentary; for more on the faux footage cycle see chapter 5. See also Carol Clover, Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992), 205.

-209-

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