Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War

By Cynthia Enloe | Go to book overview

PREFACE

I keep thinking about the young woman in the bright pink cap. A young African American woman, she was about my height, five feet two, wearing jeans and a spangly T-shirt. She was sitting in the front row. During the event’s discussion time she spoke up. She had a good, strong voice. People in the back of the college’s large auditorium said they could hear her clearly. They were listening attentively as she described the pressure put on soldiers in her unit when they returned from their duty in Iraq, pressure to absorb privately whatever lingering questions or disturbing memories they had brought home with them. She said that perhaps especially the men in her group internalized their superiors’ expectation that they would not admit to needing mental health counseling. After the event, she lingered and we continued our conversation. She would be graduating from the college that spring. With only one more year left on her army contract, she was looking forward to getting out of the military. She was worried, though, that she soon might be sent overseas again, maybe this time to Afghanistan. “I know they need me. I’m a sniper.”

This exchange was in South Carolina in March 2009. It was another in what had become an ongoing series of mind-opening conversations I had had ever since I began being invited to speak to college and community groups

-xi-

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Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Eight Women, One War 1
  • The Iraqi Women 17
  • Chapter Two - Nimo- Wartime Politics in a Beauty Parlor 19
  • Chapter Three - Maha- A Widow Returns to Baghdad 45
  • Chapter Four - Safah- The Girl from Haditha 72
  • Chapter Five - Shatha- A Legislator in Wartime 93
  • The American Women 127
  • Chapter Six - Emma and the Recruiters 129
  • Chapter Seven - Danielle- From Basketball Court to Baghdad Rooftop 150
  • Chapter Eight - Kim- "I’M in a Way Fighting My Own War" 171
  • Chapter Nine - Charlene- Picking Up the Pieces 192
  • Conclusion - The Long War 211
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 295
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