Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War

By Cynthia Enloe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Danielle
From Basketball Court to Baghdad Rooftop

Danielle Green had hoped that the U.S. Army would provide her with the family she yearned for. It had been difficult growing up on Chicago’s South and West sides during the late 1970s and through the 1980s. Three decades later, these neighborhoods would become famous for having given Barack Obama the opportunity to hone his skills as a community organizer. In the 1970s and 1980s, poverty here was rife, neglect was palpable. Many African American families came unraveled. Danielle’s father was absent, her mother became addicted to drugs. Her aunt took over parenting the young Danielle until she too succumbed to addiction. Danielle then lived with her grandmother, who supported them both with public welfare assistance. Danielle’s favorite toy, she later would recall, was “G.I. Joe.” He was “cool,” she thought. He offered a reassuring image of discipline and focus.1

G.I. Joe had his own history. A twelve-inch plastic figure of an American soldier, G.I. Joe was first launched in 1964. The toy in its original incarnation represented a fairly realistic version of an ordinary post–World War II enlisted man. In the wake of the U.S. failed war in Vietnam, G.I. Joe lost his appeal to American children. Its Rhode Island-based toy maker, Hasbro, took G.I. Joe off the market in 1976. But not for long. In 1982, with the coming of the Reagan administration, infusions of new resources into the U.S. military and its operations in Grenada, Panama, Honduras, and Nicaragua, playing with

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Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Eight Women, One War 1
  • The Iraqi Women 17
  • Chapter Two - Nimo- Wartime Politics in a Beauty Parlor 19
  • Chapter Three - Maha- A Widow Returns to Baghdad 45
  • Chapter Four - Safah- The Girl from Haditha 72
  • Chapter Five - Shatha- A Legislator in Wartime 93
  • The American Women 127
  • Chapter Six - Emma and the Recruiters 129
  • Chapter Seven - Danielle- From Basketball Court to Baghdad Rooftop 150
  • Chapter Eight - Kim- "I’M in a Way Fighting My Own War" 171
  • Chapter Nine - Charlene- Picking Up the Pieces 192
  • Conclusion - The Long War 211
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 295
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