Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War

By Cynthia Enloe | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION
The Long War

Abu Nawas Street was becoming lively again. It was early 2009. For years the street that wound its way along the banks of the Tigris in central Baghdad had been famous for its nightclubs. Then came Saddam Hussein’s post–Gulf War efforts to woo religious conservatives, followed, after 2003, by the rise of sectarian militias with their campaign against alcohol—as well as the loss of reliable water and electricity—that forced owners to shutter their nightclubs along Abu Nawas Street.

Now conditions were looking promising for the club owners. Iraq’s prime minister, trying to demonstrate his secular credentials to skeptical city voters, had allowed at least a few alcohol-serving establishments to reopen. The American soldiers and Iraq’s expanded security forces recently had driven out—or at least driven underground—many of the armed insurgents and sectarian militias who had terrorized Baghdad’s small business owners during the recent years. The U.S. government had distributed funds to businesses, and a few nightclub owners were among the recipients. Some young Iraqi men appeared to have sources of income again, enough to afford a club’s $45 entrance fee and to buy its imported beer.1

The photographs that appeared in the Washington Post on February 28, 2009, accompanying the article by reporter Sundaran Raghaven, were as surprising as the story he wrote. One photograph showed a U.S. male soldier,

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Nimo's War, Emma's War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Eight Women, One War 1
  • The Iraqi Women 17
  • Chapter Two - Nimo- Wartime Politics in a Beauty Parlor 19
  • Chapter Three - Maha- A Widow Returns to Baghdad 45
  • Chapter Four - Safah- The Girl from Haditha 72
  • Chapter Five - Shatha- A Legislator in Wartime 93
  • The American Women 127
  • Chapter Six - Emma and the Recruiters 129
  • Chapter Seven - Danielle- From Basketball Court to Baghdad Rooftop 150
  • Chapter Eight - Kim- "I’M in a Way Fighting My Own War" 171
  • Chapter Nine - Charlene- Picking Up the Pieces 192
  • Conclusion - The Long War 211
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 295
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