A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai'i

By Patrick Vinton Kirch | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Hawai’i is the most isolated archipelago on Earth. It is astonishing that Polynesian explorers in double-hulled canoes—lashed together with coconut fiber and propelled by sails of woven mats—discovered and settled these islands roughly a thousand years ago. They came upon a verdant island chain with a subtropical climate, rich soils, and abundant natural resources. Nurtured by this salubrious environment, their descendants multiplied, founding an island civilization that remained unknown to the rest of the world. Independently of what was happening in China or Japan, in Mesoamerica, or in Europe, the Hawaiian people constructed their own unique society.

This island civilization in many respects mirrored early states that arose in other favorable zones in both the Old World and the New. From a small founding population, over the course of several centuries a hierarchical society emerged, supported by a robust agricultural economy. A distinct class of chiefs depended on and managed a vast population of farming and fishing commoners. An elaborate system of rules and obligations—the kapu system—governed the relationships between the chiefs and the people. At the pinnacle of society were the island rulers, ali’i akua (literally, “god-kings”), whose prerogatives included royal incest and human sacrifice. In these practices, the Hawaiian kings resembled the pharaohs of Egypt and the Inca of Peru. Yet Hawaiian culture arose entirely independently in this most remote, most isolated of all places on Earth. How and why did this happen?

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai'i
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Prologue - Islands out of Time 1
  • Part One - Voyages 19
  • One - A Trail of Tattooed Pots 21
  • Two - East from Hawaiki 38
  • Three - Follow the Golden Plover 50
  • Four - Voyages into the Past 68
  • Five - The Sands of WaimāNalo 82
  • Part Two - In Pele’s Islands 97
  • Six - Flightless Ducks and Palm Forests 99
  • Seven - Voyaging Chiefs from Kahiki 112
  • Eight - Mā’Ilikūkahi, O’Ahu’s Sacred King 131
  • Nine - The Waters of KāNe 143
  • Ten - "Like Shoals of Fish" 156
  • Part Three - The Reign of the Feathered Gods 171
  • Eleven - ‘Umi the Unifier 173
  • Twelve - ‘Umi’s Dryland Gardens 187
  • Thirteen - The House of Pi’Ilani 202
  • Fourteen - "Like a Shark That Travels Onthe Land" 217
  • Fifteen - The Altar of Kū 231
  • Sixteen - The Return of Lono 247
  • Seventeen - Prophecy and Sacrifice 265
  • Epilogue - Hawai’I in World History 288
  • Alphabetical List of Hawaiian Historical Persons 303
  • Glossary of Hawaiian Words 311
  • Sources and Further Reading 317
  • Index 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.