Catholic Social Teaching and Economic Globalization: The Quest for Alternatives

By John Sniegocki | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
GRASSROOTS ACTION AND
POLICY ALTERNATIVES

The preceding chapter examined some of the major critiques of development and of neoliberal globalization that are put forth by grassroots critics. The current chapter will explore the visions and activities of organizations engaged in the quest for alternatives. An overview of some of the local, national, and international policies that are needed to support the construction of these positive alternatives will also be presented.


GRASSROOTS ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
THIRD WORLD: AN OVERVIEW

Throughout the Third World there are a multitude of organizations that are seeking to overcome destitution, foster respect for human rights, protect and restore local ecology, revitalize local cultures, and pursue other constructive social goals.1 These grassroots organizations take a wide variety of forms. They include peasant associations, worker associations, religious groups, neighborhood associations, women’s groups, student organizations, associations of indigenous peoples, co-

1 Good descriptions of the activities of grassroots organizations around the world can be found in Ximena de la Barra and Richard Dello Buono, Latin America after the Neoliberal Debacle: Another Region Is Possible (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2009); Marjorie Mayo, Global Citizens: Social Movements and the Challenge of Globalization(London: Zed Books, 2005); Frances Moore Lappé and Anna Lappé, Hope’s Edge (New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher, 2002); Anirudh Krishna, Norman Uphoff, and Milton Esman, eds., Reasons for Hope: Instructive Experiences in Rural Development (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian Press, 1997); Jeremy Seabrook, Pioneers of Change: Experiments in Creating a Humane Society (London: Zed Books, 1993); Ponna Wignaraja, ed., New Social Movements in the South: Empowering the People(London: Zed Books, 1993); Paul Ekins, A New World Order: Grassroots Movements for Global Change(London: Routledge, 1992); Pierre Pradervand, Listening to Africa: Developing Africa from the Grassroots(New York: Praeger, 1989).

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