The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics: The Personalities, Elections, and Events that Shaped Modern North Carolina

By Rob Christensen | Go to book overview

Illustrations
Congressman George H. White13
Governor Charles Brantley Aycock16
Governor Daniel Russell22
Senator Furnifold Simmons36
Governor Cameron Morrison54
Governor O. Max Gardner in the Executive Mansion67
Senator Robert Reynolds80
Senator Josiah Bailey90
Governor Clyde Hoey92
Cover page of political pamphlet98
Governor Kerr Scott117
Senator Frank Graham143
Governor Luther Hodges fishing159
Former senator Sam Ervin speaking against the Equal Rights Amendment174
Terry Sanford campaigning with John F. Kennedy187
President Richard Nixon campaigning with Jesse Helms and Jim Holshouser215
Senator Jesse Helms with California governor Ronald Reagan217
Jim Gardner with former governor Jim Holshouser231
Governor Jim Hunt at a Democratic rally243
Governor Jim Hunt and former governor Terry Sanford258
Harvey Gantt campaigns at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1996272
Elizabeth Dole and supporter290
Mike Easley listening to Governor Jim Hunt294
Senator John Edwards at the 2004 Democratic National Convention303

-viii-

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The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics: The Personalities, Elections, and Events that Shaped Modern North Carolina
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Prologue 7
  • Chapter 1 - The Simmons Machine 34
  • Chapter 2 - The Shelby Dynasty 62
  • Chapter 3 - Branchhead Boys 109
  • Chapter 4 - The Last of the Conservative Democrats 154
  • Chapter 5 - Dixie Dynamo 179
  • Chapter 6 - Jessecrats 203
  • Chapter 7 - Jim Hunt and the Democratic Revival 235
  • Chapter 8 - Phoenix Rising 261
  • Chapter 9 - A New Century 287
  • Epilogue 311
  • Appendix Endings 319
  • Notes 323
  • Index 345
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