Sleep in the Military: Promoting Healthy Sleep among U.S. Servicemembers

By Wendy M. Troxel; Regina A. Shih et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX H
Sleep in the Armed Forces Working Group Proceedings

This appendix describes the proceedings of a one-day expert panel meeting, held in RAND’s Arlington, Virginia, office on February 21, 2014. Specifically, the oneday RAND Sleep in the Armed Forces Meeting offered a unique opportunity to convene an invited group of DoD and civilian professionals, representing diverse backgrounds, including clinical, policy, and operational perspectives, to discuss current best practices, gaps, barriers, and recommendations to promote healthy sleep in the Armed Forces. Across the four pre-determined topic areas (self-identification of sleep problems and disorders, prevention of sleep disorders, sleep practices and programs in operational or training contexts, and sleep practices and programs in clinical and medical contexts), several common themes emerged concerning barriers to implementing best practices and recommendations to overcome these barriers, with the ultimate goal of improving sleep in military environments.

In regards to barriers, military cultural attitudes that have historically tended to undermine the importance of sleep were identified as an ongoing challenge. These cultural attitudes can serve as significant barriers to implementing healthy sleep practices across all of the working group topic areas. For instance, stigma associated with expressing a greater need for sleep may deter servicemembers from self-identifying or seeking help before a sleep problem becomes chronic and debilitating. At the operational level, the culture emphasizes mission first, with need for sleep perceived as a sign of weakness. On the other hand, data presented from some Navy attendees suggested that promoting healthy sleep by optimizing crew shift schedules can actually promote performance, and dissemination of such strategies may be useful to overcome these cultural attitudes.

Lack of awareness regarding the importance of sleep behaviors was also noted as a barrier to recognizing and addressing sleep problems. Such lack of awareness is due, at least in part, to limited education and training among leadership about the importance of sleep, and a lack of a centralized DoD-wide source on how to identify or manage sleep problems, or more broadly how to promote healthy sleep. Finally, the group noted a lack of adequate screening tools, procedures, and systems for the detection of sleep problems in military contexts.

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sleep in the Military: Promoting Healthy Sleep among U.S. Servicemembers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.