Doing Better: The Next Revolution in Ethics

By Tad Dunne | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Why is there so much disagreement on how to do better? A fundamental reason is that our methods of moral reflection are deficient. This is true of our everyday decisions as well as the ethical reflections of experts. In the present work, I invite you to discover for yourself the basic norms that affect all moral reflection as well as the several ways we disobey these norms. This invitation follows the generalized empirical method of Bernard Lonergan, in which the empirical methods of modern science are generalized to incorporate the data of consciousness. The discovery in your own consciousness of what happens when you make moral judgments will provide a foundation on which to build comprehensive models of morality, of key ethical categories, and of collaboration among ethicists. We will close with some implications for human studies, international relations, and education. An appendix gives 31 ethical categories defined in the style of a generalized empirical method.

My abiding gratitude goes out to many people who helped me understand method in ethics and write about it. But here I want to mention especially Joseph Wulftange, SJ, who introduced me to Lonergan’s Insight; to Bernard Lonergan, SJ, who patiently listened to my questions and lovingly encouraged me to trust them; to Frederick Crowe, SJ, who directed my doctoral dissertation on Lonergan’s social theory; to Colin Maloney, whose questions helped me understand how to integrate faith and learning; to Richard Wroblewski, whose persistent inquiries into the progress of this book was an encouragement all along the way; to Henry Toenjes, whose proofreading helped me shorten and simplify the manuscript; and to the gem of my heart, my wife, Dorothy Seebaldt, for her proofreading, her encouragement, and, above all, her heart.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Doing Better: The Next Revolution in Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - We Live in a Moral Universe 23
  • 3 - Our Normative Sources Are within 40
  • 4 - Our Normative Drives Are Ordered 56
  • 5 - Our Normative Drives Are Wounded 70
  • 6 - Our Normative Drives Are Healed 86
  • 7 - The Open Ethicist 100
  • 8 - Method 144
  • 9 - Models 156
  • 10 - Practical Ethics 194
  • 11 - Conclusion 222
  • Appendix- Foundational Ethical Categories 245
  • Notes 280
  • Index 292
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.