Doing Better: The Next Revolution in Ethics

By Tad Dunne | Go to book overview

4.
OUR NORMATIVE DRIVES ARE ORDERED

AN INTEGRATING SPIRAL

Each of the five exigences of our consciousness not only makes its particular demand; it also measures its own success. It will continue to disturb us as long as its demand has not been met and will rest satisfied when it has. These drives do not work automatically. Like any other system in the evolutionary process, their emergence largely depends on whatever prior developments we have undergone, what opportunities we currently have at hand, and what forces may impede our efforts to be open-minded, caring, and connected to others. Then there is that awful wound in our moral nature whereby we can deliberately refuse to follow their demands.


Integrated Levels of Our Normative Drives

But when they emerge, the drives display a beautiful, spiraling selforganization. Just as biological systems leave open possibilities for organization at the neurological level and neurological systems leave open possibilities for organization at the subconscious level, so each level of normative functions in our consciousness leaves open possibilities for organization at the next higher level. And when that organization occurs, the higher level integrates the functioning of all the levels below it, directing them toward ends proper to that higher level.

Our subconscious arranges our experience of situations into patterns at the level of conscious awareness. That is, the normativity of experience allows into awareness what is patterned and what appears capable of being patterned. It moves past what presents no possibility of being patterned.

When we pay attention to these patterned experiences, whether in the symbolic forms welling up from our subconscious, in our imagination, in our memories, or in what we perceive through our five senses, we feel the drive to understand what we experience. The normativity of intelligence has taken over, directing our consciousness to raise questions looking for explanations.

Then, at the level of being reasonable, once we have some understanding, we experience the normative drives of reason to verify that we did not misunderstand. We do this by checking to verify

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Doing Better: The Next Revolution in Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - We Live in a Moral Universe 23
  • 3 - Our Normative Sources Are within 40
  • 4 - Our Normative Drives Are Ordered 56
  • 5 - Our Normative Drives Are Wounded 70
  • 6 - Our Normative Drives Are Healed 86
  • 7 - The Open Ethicist 100
  • 8 - Method 144
  • 9 - Models 156
  • 10 - Practical Ethics 194
  • 11 - Conclusion 222
  • Appendix- Foundational Ethical Categories 245
  • Notes 280
  • Index 292
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.