America's Death Penalty: Between Past and Present

By David Garland; Randall McGowen et al. | Go to book overview

Index
abolition of slavery, 74–75
abolition of the death penalty: arguments favoring, 115–116; federal judiciary, 92–93; gradualism, 64n7; imprisonment as alternative to death penalty, 5, 25–26, 98; inevitability of, 75, 121; international legal norms, 61; for murder, 155; politics, 16, 19, 157; public opinion, 121–122, 130; as top-down reform movement, 32, 75, 123, 130; transition from authoritarian regimes to democracy, 16; U.S. Supreme Court, 157; universal human rights, 1; as Western norm, 33, 60–61; worldwide movement toward, 14
abolition of the death penalty in: Austria, 118; Britain, 61, 88, 112, 113–114, 119; Eastern Europe, 119; England, 111, 149–155; Europe, 118–119; European Union, 18–19, 61, 66n21, 72, 75–79, 124; France, 61, 62, 63, 88, 118, 123; Germany, 60, 110, 111, 116–118; Ireland, 118; Italy, 60, 61, 118; Labour Party (United Kingdom), 88, 116, 118, 130, 147, 155, 156; Portugal, 61, 63, 119; Spain, 61, 63, 119; United Kingdom, 61, 62, 130; United States, 110, 119, 130
abolitionists’ self-image, 107
absolutism, 36–38, 57, 65n18, 66n24
African Commission on Human and People’s Rights, 71n113
Agamben, Giorgio, 206
Ahmadinejad, Mahmoud, 11
Aikens v. California, 104n66
Alabama, 211
American Civil Liberties Union, 211
American Convention on Human Rights Protocol to Abolish the Death Penalty, 61
American exceptionalism: death penalty, 2–3, 14, 78, 107–108, 125; treatment of convicts, 219n72
American Federation of Labor, 209
Amsterdam, Anthony, 18
Anderson v. Salant, 209–210
anti-slavery movement, 74–75, 87
Arab Charter of Human Rights, 71n113
Asian Human Rights Charter, 71n113
Atkins v. Virginia, 7, 99
Auburn state prison (New York), 198–200, 207
Australia, 61
Austria, 16, 49, 60, 118
Badinter, Robert, 119
Ban, Ki-moon, 9
Bank of England and execution of forgers, 40, 134, 140–141, 145, 146
Banner, Stuart, 47, 120
Barbados, 17
Bayley, John, 145–146
Baze v. Rees, 6–7, 8, 100
Beattie, John, 47
Beccaria, Cesare, 57, 66n21, 107
Belgium, 61, 118
Benedict XVI, Pope, 7
“benefit of belly,” 42
“benefit of clergy,” 42
Bentham, Jeremy, 48, 57
Bentley, Derek, 154
Bethea, Rainey, 48

-223-

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