Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

An original volume of this scope would have been impossible to produce without the input of dozens of scholars and community stakeholders. Throughout this eight-year project, we indeed have been fortunate to benefit from such input, particularly from our contributors, to whom we are deeply indebted. We are especially grateful to Dawn Jefferson, who logged countless hours helping us edit the following chapters into what we hope is a coherent whole. Of course, we also would be remiss if we did not thank our editor at NYU Press, Ilene Kalish, and her assistant, Aiden Amos, for believing in the project and for keeping it on track.

The following alphabetical list recognizes the other people and organizations that have contributed to this project, from concept to page: Muhtarat Agoro, Meron Ahadu, H. Samy Alim, Mark Alleyne, Teresa Barnett, Wren Brown, Bunche Center Staff, Bunche Center Community Advisory Board, Kenny Burrell, Shani Byard, California African American Museum, Marne Campbell, Brandy Chappell, Robyn Charles, Nicole Chase, Avery Clayton, Edward Comeaux, Jacqueline DjeDje, Winston Doby, Faustina DuCros, Shirley Jo Finney, Ford Foundation, J. Paul Getty Trust, Kevin Fosnacht, Lorn Foster, Franklin Gilliam, David Grant, Jamel Greer, Jasmine Greene, Lucy Florence Cultural Center, Nandini Gunewardena, C. R. D. Halisi, Tina Henderson, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Jennifer Hinton, Cynthia Hudley, Pamela Huntoon, Angela James, Uma Jayakumar, Amber Johnson, Birgitta Johnson, J. Daniel Johnson, Robin Nicole Johnson, Tiffany Jones, Mandla Kayise, Jonathan “J” Kidd, Mei-Ling Malone, Beza Merid, Derrick Mims, Eric Moore, Nicole Moore, Ernest Morrell, Cynthia Mosqueda, Worku Nida, Chinyere Osuji, Bernard Parks, Jennifer Payne, Karisa Peer, Theri Pickens, Virgil Roberts, Mark Sawyer, Woody Schofleld, Robert Singleton, Anton Smith, Alva Stevenson, Peter Taylor, Jervey Tervalon, Roena Rabelo Vega, Christine Vu, Tara Watford, Steve Wesson, Christopher d Jimenez y West, Kelvin L. White, Theresa White, UCLA Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Center for Community Partnerships, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, and Christina Zanfagna.

-vii-

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