Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
From Central Avenue to Leimert Park
The Shifting Center of Black Los Angeles

Reginald Chappie

Since the turn of the twentieth century, there have been two prominent black centers in Los Angeles: the Central Avenue community from approximately 1900 to 1950, and the Crenshaw/Leimert Park Village community from approximately 1960 to the present. Central Avenue and Crenshaw Boulevard, respectively, form the main commercial spines of each center and are spatially connected by a seven-mile stretch of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, which moves from the west at Rodeo Road to the east and terminates at Central Avenue.

One of the main elements that defined these two geographic areas as black centers in their respective time periods was their thriving commercial districts. Both areas were populated by black entrepreneurs who employed people of African descent and provided goods and services that catered to the black population. Central Avenue’s heyday was during the Jim Crow era, which produced de jure racialized ghettos marked by the black entrepreneurship and homeownership clustered around the major thoroughfare. The Crenshaw/Leimert Park District emerged later, after the outlawing of restrictive housing covenants by the U.S. Supreme Court spurred an out-migration of blacks from the Central Avenue community. Although blacks had fanned out to other parts of Los Angeles County —including the West Adams District, Inglewood, Pico/LaBrea, Pacoima, and Watts—by the end of the first decade of the 2000s, the Crenshaw/ Leimert Park Village community was the largest resettlement community of African Americans in Los Angeles.

The process of placemaking by black Angelenos provides a window on understanding the spatial impact of black entrepreneurship, politics,

-60-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 439

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.