Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
SOLAR
The History of the Sounds of Los Angeles Records

Scot Brown

SOLAR (Sound of Los Angeles Records) was the most dominant, blackowned record label from the late 1970s through the 1980s.1 SOLAR, known as the Motown of the 1980s, dominated R&B and pop music with a run of hits from a large roster of artists, including The Whispers, Shalamar, Lakeside, Midnight Star, Klymaxx, Carrie Lucas, The Deele, Calloway, and Babyface. SOLAR flourished in the midst of a major transformation in the history of American and African American music—large entertainment conglomerates took a serious interest in gaining a stronghold in black music consumer markets. This change corresponded with a trend toward globalization and corporate consolidation in the music industry at large, leading to the virtual eradication of any significant market share on the part of independent labels.2 The drift toward consolidation and usurpation accelerated in the decades to follow, thereby generating new competitive challenges for the survival of black-owned record companies.

The late 1970s was not necessarily an opportune time for a start-up black record label, as major companies had established “black music divisions” aimed at gaining a foothold in African American music consumer markets. Larkin Arnold (Capitol), LaBaron Taylor (CBS), and Tom Draper (Warner Bros.) were among a slew of talented black executives who redesigned artist recruitment and product marketing practices to fit the distinctiveness of the African American music market—business strategies that had been, prior to the 1970s, the domains of black-owned and small “boutique” labels.3 Though Motown Records (which had moved to Los Angeles in 1972) continued to reign as one of the most powerful African American enterprises, its commanding position vis-a-vis popular music

-266-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 439

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.