Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
Concerned Citizens
Environmental (In)Justice in
Black Los Angeles

Sonya Winton

In August 1985, two African American women learned that the City of Los Angeles had selected their neighborhood as the site for a thirteenacre, municipal solid waste incinerator plant. They immediately took action by establishing the Concerned Citizens of South Central Los Angeles (CCSCLA)—“one of the first African American environmental organizations in the country.”1 Through their locally based environmental justice organization, Robin Cannon and Charlotte Bullock—who possessed moderate grassroots activism experience2—launched a large-scale protest campaign against a $535 million bond issue for the development of the Los Angeles City Energy Recovery (LANCER) Municipal Waste Incinerator.3 According to Cannon, “The minute LANCER sprang up, we saw it as a health threat, but we also considered it an environmental issue. An incinerator has the potential to impact the air, the land, and the water. LANCER [could have] affected the totality of where we lived and worked.”4

Los Angeles’s economically disadvantaged communities of color already faced more than their fair share of environmental hazards, and LANCER posed yet another potentially adverse health risk to the predominantly black and poor inhabitants in Cannons neighborhood.5 Initial reports estimated that LANCER would have emitted “nearly 5 million tons of ash —most destined for landfills—of which over 8 million pounds would … [have] spewed into adjacent neighborhoods from its 280 foot main stack, as well as an additional 150,000 pounds of cooling tower particulate matter emissions.”6

-343-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 439

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.