Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

Bibliography

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———. Deep Down in the Jungle: Negro Narrative Folklore from the Streets of Philadelphia. Chicago: Aldine, 1964.

Adler, Patricia R. “Watts: From Suburb to Black Ghetto.” PhD diss., University of Southern California, 1977

Almaguer, Tomás. Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.

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———. Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990.

———. Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City. New York: Norton, 1999.

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Asch, Peter, and Joseph J. Seneca. “The Incidence of Automobile Pollution Control.” Public Finance Review 6, no. 2 (1978): 193–203.

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