Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities

By Darnell Hunt; Ana-Christina Ramón | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

Melina Abdullah is associate professor of Pan-African studies at California State University, Los Angeles. She has contributed to the edited volumes Racial and Ethnic Politics in California, Black Women’s Intellectual Traditions, and The Black Urban Community.

Alex Alonso is a geographer and gang expert who has testified and consulted in more than two hundred criminal court cases.

Dionne Bennett is an anthropologist and assistant professor of African American studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She is the author of Sepia Dreams: A Celebration of Black Achievement Through Words and Images.

Joshua Bloom is a doctoral candidate in sociology at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). He is author of Black Against Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Black Panther Party (with Waldo E. Martin Jr.), and editor of Low Wage Worker Organizing and Advocacy: The L.A. Model (with Ruth Milkman and Victor Narro).

Edna Bonacich is professor emeritus of sociology and ethnic studies at the University of California, Riverside. She has written extensively on labor issues, including the classic article, “A Theory of Ethnic Antagonism: The Split Labor Market.”

Scot Brown is associate professor of history at UCLA. He is the author of Fighting for US: Maulana Karenga, the US Organization, and Black Cultural Nationalism.

Reginald Chappie is director of the West Coast Center of the School of Community Economic Development at Southern New Hampshire University, former president and CEO of the Dunbar Economic Development Corporation in the historical Central Avenue community of Los Angeles, and a doctoral candidate in Anthropology at UCLA.

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