Failing Our Veterans: The G.I. Bill and the Vietnam Generation

By Mark Boulton | Go to book overview

Conclusion
“A Chance for Learning” Missed

In the summer of 1968, Stephen Piotrowski’s life was at a crossroads. With high school graduation looming, a succession of rejected grant and scholarship applications had dashed his immediate hopes of going to college. His brother was close to returning home from a tour of duty as an air force mechanic in Vietnam and, with the risk of his draft number being called, Piotrowski decided to enlist in the army. He was well aware of the controversial nature of the war and of the risks involved in volunteering, but several factors dictated his decision. Failure to secure funding for college meant that the prospect of a G.I. Bill held great appeal. “I didn’t have the scholarships,” he recalled, “[so] I went down and saw the recruiter and said, look, I want the G.I. Bill.” Piotrowski also felt a strong sense of civic duty to serve. With his father and uncles being World War II veterans, service “was part of the family history, part of what you did.” In addition, he still held a firm conviction that the Vietnam War was a righteous cause and that the government would not send its citizens to fight in an immoral conflict. He still believed that “the war was something . . . where we must be right.” Three days after graduating high school, Piotrowski was in uniform. He completed his basic training in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and advanced infantry training in Fort Lewis, Washington. Following airborne training in Fort Benning, Georgia, he was sent to Vietnam as part of the 173rd Airborne Division in January 1969. Piotrowski’s plane touched down in Tan Son Nhut airport amid the mortar attacks and enemy fire of the Tet ‘69 offensive. Though less well known than Tet ‘68, the Tet ‘69 Communist attacks were intense enough that Piotrowski was convinced that he would not survive his tour of duty. A feeling of calm came over him at that point, he remembers, which gave him a sense of acceptance of whatever fate lay ahead.

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Failing Our Veterans: The G.I. Bill and the Vietnam Generation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.