Puro Arte: Filipinos on the Stages of Empire

By Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I must begin by expressing my profound gratitude to the artists, cultural workers, performers, and many others who occupy the multiple stages of this book. Your labor has given me much to think about and engage with. I remain plagued by the limits of my own analysis but hopeful that what I begin here will be enough to generate further thoughts on, and surely much more complex readings of, Filipino/a performance. I thank Alleluia Panis, joel b tan, Christine Bacareza Balance, and Olivia Malabuyo for allowing me to run with puro arte.

My interest in Filipino performance was first galvanized by the social protest theater of Sining Bayan. I thank Ermena Vinluan, Abe Toribio, and the late Helen Toribio for their generosity and kindness. Their years of political work marked by disappearances, loss, and death did not taint their willingness to share their KDP stories and materials. My work with Roberta Uno, New WORLD Theater, and the Uno Archive Collection of Plays by Asian American Women started me on the pursuit of Sining Bayan. Where it got me may be quite different from where I started, but they have all made a lasting impact on my writing. Roberta provided opportunities and was the first to recognize the potential in my work. I am grateful to have been a part of her vision of a new world. I must also thank my Filipina faculty mentor and friend at the University of Massachusetts, Sally Habana-Hafner; her work with local immigrant and refugee communities in Amherst, Massachusetts, made such a difference to many of us. I have enjoyed seeing where Sunaina Maira, Cathy Schlund-Vials, and Anita Mannur, collaborators in building Asian American Studies in the Five Colleges, have taken the field of Asian American Studies.

I began this project when I was a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at UC–Santa Cruz. My two years at UCSC were hugely formative. The Feminist Studies Department was welcoming and encouraging, beginning with Bettina Aptheker. Judy Yung kindly agreed to be my faculty mentor during the first year of the fellowship. During my time at UCSC, I experienced the support of a robust and vibrant feminist presence, with colleagues such as Gina Dent, Angela Davis, and Carla Freccero. The

-vii-

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Puro Arte: Filipinos on the Stages of Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction - Putting on a Show 1
  • 1 - "Which Way to the Philippines?"- United Stages of Empire 21
  • 2 - "Splendid Dancing"- Of Filipinos and Taxi Dance Halls 49
  • 3 - Coup de Théâtre- The Drama of Martial Law 75
  • 4 - "How in the Light of One Night Did We Come So Far?"- Working Miss Saigon 107
  • Coda- Culture Shack 139
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 185
  • About the Author 192
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