Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century

By Kyla Wazana Tompkins | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO THE INTRODUCTION

1. A far-from-exhaustive list would include the recently published Parama Roy, Alimentary Tracts: Appetites, Aversions, and the Postcolonial (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010); Gang Yue, The Mouth That Begs: Hunger, Cannibalism, and the Politics of Eating in Modern China (Durham: Duke University Press, 1999); Cecelia Lawless, “Cooking, Community, Culture: A Reading of Like Water for Chocolate,” in Recipes for Reading: Community Cookbooks, Stories, Histories, ed. Anne Bower (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997); Emma Parker, “You Are What You Eat: The Politics of Eating in the Novels of Margaret Atwood,” Twentieth-Century Literature 41:3 (1995): 349–369; Jennifer A. Ho, Consumption and Identity in Asian American Coming-of-Age Novels (New York: Routledge, 2005); Wenying Xu, Eating Identities: Reading Food in Asian American Literature (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008).

2. For earlier examples of body studies work with an interest in food and eating see Susan Bordo, Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); and Sander L. Gilman, Fat Boys: A Slim Book (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004). See also Sander L. Gilman, Fat: A Cultural History of Obesity (Malden, MA: Polity, 2008). Two important predecessors to this book in dealing with race and food are Doris Witt, Black Hunger: Food and the Politics of U.S. Identity (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999); Psyche A. Williams-Forson, Building Houses Out of Chicken Legs: Black Women, Food, and Power (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006); and also Melanie DuPuis, Nature’s Perfect Food: How Milk Became America’s Drink (New York: NYU Press, 2002). I am particularly indebted to Sander Gilman and my fellow students for their insights during Professor Gilman’s summer seminar on fat and the body, “Body Matters,” at the 2002 School for Criticism and Theory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

3. Jennifer K. Ruark, “More Scholars Focus on Historical, Social, and Cultural Meanings of Food, but Some Critics Say It’s Scholarship-Lite: Selected Books in Food Studies,” Chronicle of Higher Education, July 9, 1999, http://chronicle.com/article/More-ScholarsFocus-on-Hist/15471/ (accessed May 23, 2011).

4. On the former see Laurier Turgeon and Madeleine Pastinelli, “‘Eat the World’: Postcolonial Encounters in Quebec City’s Ethnic Restaurants,” Journal of American

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