Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century

By Kyla Wazana Tompkins | Go to book overview

Index
Illustrations are denoted by page numbers in italics, or by reference to the numbered Color Plate section.
abolitionists and abolitionism: and biopolitics, 69; and bodily basis of exclusion from power, 223n59; and Hawthorne’s House of Seven Gables, 98; reform movement often aligned with, 8–9, 88; religion and, 56; and slave body conflated with the white female body, 217n8; and stain of slavery, 98; in Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin,11, 103, 112–113; and sugar, 97, 219–220n27; in Wilson’s Our Nig, 11, 91, 118, 119, 224–225n79. See also reform movements
addiction: in Louisa May Alcott’s writing, 125, 132, 137–138, 140, 142–143; biopolitics and production of, 125, 138; China and opium, production of, 125, 132, 138, 140, 142–143; invented by temperance movement, 126, 138, 143, 226n8; to masturbation, 79, 213–214n95; as producing temperance movement, 138; and the temperate body, 137
advertising, 12–13; black-owned or women-run businesses, 174, 180, 237n64; comedy and, 162, 172–173, 174; customer testimonials, 148; disconnect between product and image drawing in the viewer, 172, 236n57, 237–238n68, Color Plates 24,30–31; dream images, 155, 179; and the female gaze, 159, 233nn31—32, 234–235n40; first images of African Americans in, 238n72; marketing, 153–154; poems of, 148; publicity, 155; and public spheres, distinct demographics of, 173–174; rise of, 147–148; shock and disgust in response to, 150, 175, 180–181; training consumer’s attention span, 163. See also trade card advertisements; trade card advertisements, the theater transported to
agency of black subjects, 8–9, 95, 149–150, 173, 186–187. See also black body as edible object, indigestibility of; black resistance
Ahmed, Sara, 16, 191n7, 193–194nn19—20, 197n3
Alcott, Bronson: as father of Louisa May, 124; Fruitlands, 134–135, 219–220n27; sugar excluded from diet of, 219n27; and temperance, 56; vegetarianism and dietary rules of, 87, 134–135. See also Transcendental Wild Oats (Louisa May Alcott)
Alcott, Louisa May: family life of, 124, 134–135; favorite plot template of, 126127; Grahamites as influence on, 12, 54, 124–126, 128, 131, 132, 135–137, 142, 226n7; and interracial marriage, 139142, 144; and reformist ideal of white femininity, 12. Works: Eight Cousins, 124–125, 126, 127–134, 136–137, 138, 154, 226n7, 228n49; Jo’s Boys,126; Little Men, 126; Little Women,123, 126–127; “M.L.,” 139; Old-Fashioned Girl, An,227n29;

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