The Makeover: Reality Television and Reflexive Audiences

By Katherine Sender | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My sincere thanks go, first, to the generous people who completed the surveys and agreed to talk about makeover television for this project. They trusted me with their revealing perceptions of the shows and their engagements with them, even as they were aware of a general disparagement of the genre and its viewers.

The data collection and initial analysis would not have been possible without the skill and commitment of a team of research fellows at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania: Christopher Finlay, Nicole Rodgers, Adrienne Shaw, Riley Snorton, and Margaret Sullivan. Their rigor, enthusiasm, and sense of humor helped to produce an amazingly rich body of data.

This project has been supported by the unfailing dedication of the Annenberg staff, especially our librarian Sharon Black, whose shrewd eye kept a lookout for new work on the topic; and Rich Cardona, Lizz Cooper, and Cory Falk, without whose patient and timely computer support this project would have floundered.

Thanks also to my colleagues at Annenberg, with whom I have talked about various aspects of this project, especially Joe Cappella, Bob Hornik, Elihu Katz, Carolyn Marvin, Sharrona Pearl, and Barbie Zelizer. Diana Mutz generously shared her research participants with me. My special appreciation goes to the dean, Michael Delli Carpini, who was extraordinarily generous with research funds and time to complete this project.

Within the Penn community more broadly, my thanks and affection go to my colleagues in the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program—Rita Barnard, Demie Kurz, and Shannon Lundeen—for their intellectual engagement with the project and for a summer fellowship in 2006. Other key Penn friends and colleagues have guided me along the way, including Peter Decherney, Kathy Peiss, and Peter Stallybrass.

-vii-

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