The Makeover: Reality Television and Reflexive Audiences

By Katherine Sender | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adkins, Lisa, 20
Advertising, 32
Affective identification, 123
African Americans: behavior and, 89; consumer society critique from, 77; ethnic anonymity and, 149; overweight acceptance of, 39; stereotypes of, 128; What Not to Wear experts and, 68
Ahmed, Sarah, 83
Alasuutari, Pertti, 181, 191
Alger, Horatio, 29
American Idol, 85
Andrejevic, Mark, 157, 177, 189; candidate surveillance comments of, 82; immaterial labor arguments of, 45; TWoP participation arguments of, 111–12
Ang, Ien, 118, 191, 198–99; Dallas study of, 119; emotional realism from, 107; viewer engagement analysis of, 175
Artificial circumstances, 133–34
Attitude, 128–29
Audience: active audience theory, 7; activities as immaterial labor of, 193–94; candidate identity and, 123–24, 174–75; contempt of candidates by, 94–95, 99; free psychotherapy for, 51–52; gullible dupes of reality television, 166; inner transformation investment of, 179; institutions reinvested in by, 196, 200; instructional elements and, 78; intimate relationship with self of, 188–89; makeover television comments empowering, 189–90; media-reflexivity of, 176; message boards offering expertise of, 66–67; reflexive self constructed by, 5; reflexivity and engagement of, 20, 192; reflexivity rerouting, 195–96; schadenfreude and, 94; self-reflexivity used by, 14–15, 137–38; show’s expertise used in professional career of, 64; social interactions of, 111; textual factors and, 9–10; What Not to Wear expertise of, 61–62; What Not to Wear tips picked up by, 49. See also Candidates
Audience research: contradictory investments findings in, 177; data yielded in, 190–91; developing questions for, 13; feminist cultural studies approach to, 9–10; lay theories in, 173; media engagement in, 173–74, 184; online surveys used in, 11; participant awareness in, 172; participant interventions in, 169; qualitative methods in, 165; reflexive self produced in, 184–85; reflexivity understanding through, 7–8, 24, 164–65, 172–73, 182–83, 189–92; self-selection in, 99; structural position in, 177–78, 181; surveys and interviews used in, 10–11, 184; texts meanings and, 191–92; voluntary participation in, 191
Augustine, 137
Authentic talk, 115
Barthes, Roland, 78
Baumeister, Roy, 137
Beck, Ulrich, 18–19, 138, 158
Before-and-after comparisons, 31–32
Behavior, 89–90
Benjamin, Walter, 83
Berlant, Lauren, 21, 29, 44, 197
Big Brother, 224n14
The Biggest Loser: authentic expression of emotions on, 116–17, 121–23; criticism of instructions of, 68–69;

-237-

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