This Year's Model: Fashion, Media, and the Making of Glamour

By Elizabeth A. Wissinger | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Thanks are in order to so many, this abbreviated space will no doubt leave someone out, and for that I am sorry; you know who you are, and to you, I am also very grateful.

Many a research study begins with just one person, and this is no exception. Well, there are two. For the suggestion that started it all, I am grateful to Sharon Zukin, whose urban sociology class helped me see modeling as a research topic long before studying models became a “thing.” The idea to investigate modeling sociologically would have been dead in the water, however, without my dear friend and associate Renée Torrière. Renée, I can’t thank you enough for being my informant, inside track, and mega-conduit to the secret sacred world of modeling. You introduced me to some wonderful people, and I feel lucky to have met them. I am particularly grateful to the fashion stylist, whose name I’ve purposely forgotten, my first ever interview, in a sleek café where I felt completely out of place. No question was too dumb, and by admiring my lopsided attempt to style up my Jansen backpack with some rhinestone buttons, she gave me the jolt of confidence I needed to press on with my investigation. To all who took the time to meet with me or take me along, sharing the intimate details of your working lives, your generosity was amazing, and I thank you for it.

A project of this scope needs proper, consistent, and unstinting mentorship, and for that I am forever indebted to Patricia Clough—a tireless, uncompromising, inspirational, funny, kind, fantastic guiding light, who did not hesitate to remind me not to be stupid! Similarly, Stanley Aronowitz, thank you for being a brilliant interlocutor and lecturer. I had the pleasure of soaking up your ideas just about every single day for nine years, and I shall always be grateful for your courageous insistence on avoiding “scholarsh&t” by pushing us to return to the essential question, “What is at stake?”

I would have been lost at sea in the storm of ideas that was that thing called “graduate school” had it not been for my study group, sometimes

-xiii-

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