This Year's Model: Fashion, Media, and the Making of Glamour

By Elizabeth A. Wissinger | Go to book overview

Conclusion
The Affective Turn

While I do not claim that my findings from the modeling industry can resolve debates about mind/body dualism, my work engages with questions of how bodies are conceived to examine how those conceptions shape social action and affective systems of power and regulation. This chapter situates my findings about modeling, embodiment, and technology in the debates about affect stirred up in the age of the blink. Starting in the mid 2000s, as the blink regime pulled bodily forces of affect and affectivity into new networks of value, affect became an urgent concept to investigate within academic circles.1 Pushing the notion of affect to include an interim space between body and mind, physiological arousal and conscious realization of it, dovetailed with the move toward exploring post-structuralist notions of the body. The “affective turn” in social theorizing built on post-structuralist feminist accounts of the self and the body (such as those found in the work of Elizabeth Grosz, Judith Butler, and Donna Haraway),2 which sought to destabilize the notion of the rational, self-governed subject. The notorious post-modern “death of the subject” favored a conception of self, body, gender, and materiality that did not assume the existence of a subject residing in what the sociologist Erving Goffman refers to as an “epidermally bounded container.”3 Rather, it depicted the self as what the social theorist Donna Haraway has famously termed a “material semiotic node,”4 existing through interaction, ineluctably entangled in shifting networks of culture, power, language, and images.

Affect can be a confusing concept, since, as the media scholars Melissa Gregg and Gregory Seigworth point out, “there is no single, generalizable theory of affect,” in part because “affect emerges out of muddy, unmediated relatedness.”5 The muddiness of the concept may explain a common problem with critiques of affect studies, in which

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
This Year's Model: Fashion, Media, and the Making of Glamour
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 353

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.