Women on Ice: Methamphetamine Use among Suburban Women

By Miriam Boeri | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Gendered Risks
VIOLENCE AND CRIME

SKY

Sky is a thirty-eight-year-old white woman who was raised in the suburban enclaves of poverty. She was born in one of the larger suburban towns surrounding the city and lived in this same area at the time of the interview. Both her mother and her father were methamphetamine addicts, and her grandmother raised her. When her grandmother died, she was sent to live with her mother and stepfather. Her stepfather proceeded to rape her regularly when she was only eleven:

Did you tell anyone?

Well, he used to threaten me because, right before this happened my grand-
mother died. The one that helped raise me. And my grandfather just
didn’t feel as though he could take care of me by his self. So he sent me
to live with my mom and my stepdad. And he—my stepdad used to
threaten me if I tell anybody, then he’ll kill—he’ll do something to my
mom and I’ll lose my mom. I’d just lost my grandma so I was scared to
tell anybody. But after two years it got to the point where any time I
wanted to do anything or go anywhere or anything, I had to have sex
with him to do it. And one of my mom’s best friends had came and got
me and my stepsister to help her do some yard work. She was going to
pay us; it was during the summer. And I told her I really don’t want to
do anything I just want to go sit outside on the swing. And when she
came outside I was crying. So I broke down and told her what happened.
And then my mom didn’t believe me so she made me go live with my
dad…. I ran away at thirteen. I was gone for seven and a half months to
[another state]. I started stripping in a club and snorting cocaine … me
and the girl that ran away with me, we went to [Big City] and we ran
into these two men that said that they were going to New Orleans, and
they could help us get a job. And we were what—thirteen? So get a job,
yeah, let’s go! So we went with them. And the job ended up being

-111-

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