Making the American Mouth: Dentists and Public Health in the Twentieth Century

By Alyssa Picard | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1. Lexus advertisement, Wall Street Journal, Wednesday, October 27, 1999.
2. Janet Carlson Freed, “Word of Mouth: Cosmetic Treatments for Teeth,” Town & Country 152 (August 1998): 54.
3. Elizabeth Hayt, “Blinding Them with Smiles,” New York Times, September 18, 2000.
4. Ibid.
5. “Dental and Oral Conditions of Recruits,” Dental Cosmos (September 1916): 1071–1075.
6. A. Lehrmann, “A Few Words about the Practice of Dentistry Here with That in Russia,” Western Dental Journal 21 (January 1907): 10.
7. For a short description of the effects of the Harrison Act and its enforcement, see Margaret Battin et al., Drugs and Justice: Seeking a Consistent, Coherent, Comprehensive View (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008), 34.
8. See, for example, Kathy Peiss, Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1986).
9. Elizabeth Giangrego, “The Life and Times of Painless Parker,” as published by the Pierre Fauchard Academy on its website, www.fauchard.org/inquiries/ museum/07/PP/index.htm (accessed May 19, 2008).
10. Malvin Ring, Dentistry: An Illustrated History (St. Louis: Mosby, 1985), 4.
11. James Wynbrandt, The Excruciating History of Dentistry (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998), 146
12. Frank Norris, McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (1899; repr., New York: Penguin Books, 1982), passim.
13. The figure of McTeague played powerfully in dentists’ minds as an example of inadequate ambition. One writer summoned up the character to dismiss other dentists who failed to adapt to new social and economic conditions this way: “Standards had changed. McTeague’s inability to grasp the fact of change, to reconcile himself to its logical inevitability, and to adapt himself to a new order of events, far removed from the grooves in which he had spent his daily life for fifteen years, is strikingly comparable, it seems to me, to the perturbed effusions concerning social changes today. Too many of us have believed we have made vocational adjustments whereas in reality we have merely fitted ourselves into grooves …” “E.H.D,” “Beneath It All,” Dental Digest 40 (August 1934): 281.
14. On the process of raising educational standards within medicine, see Kenneth Ludmerer, Learning to Heal: The Development of American Medical Education (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985). In dentistry, see Norman Gevitz, “Autonomous Profession or Medical Specialty: The Stomatological Movement and American Dentistry,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 62 (1988): 410.
15. In 1918, a B’nai Brith survey suggested that 23.4 percent of all dental students in the United States were Jewish (Hasia Diner, In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews and Blacks, 1915–1935 [Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1977], 5). But,

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