Order and Chivalry: Knighthood and Citizenship in Late Medieval Castile

By Jesûs D. Rodríguez-Velasco; Eunice Rodríguez Ferguson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the last conversation between my parents and me. Both were born in a small Castilian town in 1923, and both passed away almost together—he in the summer of 2008, she in the summer of 2009. While they were here, I had the opportunity to talk to them about this book on many occasions. I could even show them some of the manuscripts with which I was working, and they looked at them with an ineffable mix of awe and intelligence. My father was an artist with a broad sense of curiosity that included the sciences, literature, politics, and the law; he had to stop studying because of the civil war (1936–39), but later, with the personal and intellectual dedication of my mother—whose studies were also cut short by the war—he (or perhaps I should say they) brilliantly obtained his degree in law at 55. My mother’s passion for the arts and literature was just as broad and deep; moreover, she had a gift for condensing complex concepts into very short, cogent, and witty utterances. I do not mention this only for the sake of a laudatio parentium or because of the pain of a recent loss; it is above all because they both gave me recommendations and ideas that are actual part of this particular work. This book is an homage to two beings with whom I had the privilege to spend more than 43 years of my existence; a humble tribute to two intelligent, generous, and extraordinarily affectionate beings.

I enjoy the immense fortune of having a remarkable circle of friends and colleagues. These are, in alphabetical order, the people who in various ways, all directly related to this book, have proven fundamental throughout this research: Nicolás Agrait, Carlos Alvar, Heather Bamford, Francisco Bautista, Stanley Brandes, Juan Manuel Cacho Blecua, Pilar Carceller, Pedro Cátedra, Juan Carlos Conde, Emanuele Conte, Jerry Craddock, Tara Daly, María Jesús Díez Garretas, Dru Dougherty, Catherine Durand, Noel Fallows, Francisco Gago, Michel Garcia, Enrique Gavilán, Michael Gerli, Hans-Ulrich Gumbrecht, Carlos Heusch, Seth Kimmel, Germán Labrador, Jeremy Lawrance, Maria Luisa López Vidriero, Marta Madero, Denis Menjot, Alberto Montaner, José Manuel Nieto Soria, Chema Rabasa, Joan Ramon Resina, Miguel

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Order and Chivalry: Knighthood and Citizenship in Late Medieval Castile
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Middle Ages Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - Poetics of the Ordo 1
  • Chapter One - Ritual as a Strategy for Chivalric Creation 15
  • Chapter Two - Poetics of Fraternity 46
  • Chapter Three - The Presence of the Confraternity 84
  • Chapter Four - The Order of the Sash 118
  • Chapter Five - Rewriting the Order 160
  • Chapter Six - Poetics of the Chivalric Emblem 199
  • Conclusions 228
  • Notes 234
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 287
  • Acknowledgments 291
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