Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890

By Hilary Green | Go to book overview

6 Rethinking Partners
Black Mobilians’ Struggle for Quality
Public Schools

On July 19, 1870, white Mobilians celebrated the departure of the Freedmen’s Bureau with discussions of its legacy for their city, state, and region. The Mobile Daily Register summed up the discussions with the following conclusion: “The Freedman’s Bureau has finished its work, and passed into history. No institution was ever more bitterly opposed, and at the same time, more warmly defended. No act of legislature in the history of the world, has resulted in so much good, to so great a number, in so short a time, and at so little cost as that which gave existence to the ‘Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands.’” In focusing on the agency’s educational legacy for black Mobilians, the unknown author hoped that “the Freedmen learned these lessons and learned them well, thousands of school houses, and the general law and order which prevail in the south, wherever the white law and order which prevail in the south, wherever the white Democratic Ku Klux do not disturb them, prove conclusively.” While the Bureau’s educational legacy left an indelible mark on white Mobilians, it was unclear for black Mobilians whether local school officials would continue to build on the educational progress achieved under the Freedmen’s Schools.1

Like their Richmond counterparts, the first decade of public schools merely signaled a new phase in black Mobilians’ struggle for education, freedom, and citizenship. They shifted their activism with the quality school campaigns, but for different reasons than did black Richmonders. Partisan politics would thrust black Mobilians into the quality campaigns. As new educational partners jockeyed for administrative control of the schools, the new political reality forced black Mobilians to look inward and reflect on their goals for the public schools. This introspection made them draw more on their internal networks, reevaluate old partnerships, and, whenever possible, rely less on their white educational partners for success. The quality campaigns, therefore, represented a fight for the very survival of the public schools for their children. They realized that quality public schools under the direction of African American and Creole teachers would prevent previous educational victories from becoming moot. Over the

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.