Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890

By Hilary Green | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. David W. Blight, ed., A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives (Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt, 2007), 214–15.

2. Ibid.

3. Daniel B. Williams, Freedom and Progress, and Other Choice Addresses on Practical, Scientific, Educational, Philosophic, Historic, and Religious Subjects (Petersburg, Va.: Daniel B. Williams, 1890), 7–8, 82, 86–87.

4. Ibid., 86–87; Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana, “‘Sail on O Ship of State!’: How Longfellow Came to Write These Lines 100 Years Ago,” Colby Quarterly 2 (February 1950): 209–14.

5. Christian G. Samito, Becoming American under Fire: Irish Americans, African Americans, and the Politics of Citizenship during the Civil War Era (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2009), 4.

6. Ibid., 5–12.

7. Midori Takagi, Rearing Wolves to Our Destruction: Slavery in Richmond, Virginia, 1782–1865 (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999), 21–23; Gregg D. Kimball, American City, Southern Place: A Cultural History of Antebellum Richmond (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2000), 3–36.

8. Harriett Amos, Cotton City: Urban Development in Antebellum Mobile (Birmingham: University of Alabama Press, 1985), 7, 22–24, 26–47, 196.

9. Census records, 1800–60; “Richmond Population, 1742–1860,” African American Lecture Series, September 25, 2001, Vertical File-Richmond Slavery, VHS; Amos, Cotton City, 85.

10. Howard N. Rabinowitz, Race Relations in the Urban South, 1865–1890 (1978; repr., Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996), 3, 31; John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2000), 141; Steven Hahn, A Nation under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 2003), 22; Amos, Cotton City, 85, 88–89.

11. Henrico County (Va.): Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1852–63, LVA; Society for the Prevention of the Absconding and Abduction of Slaves, Richmond, Va., Minutes of Directors’ Meetings, 1833–49, VHS; Nancy C. Frantel, Richmond Virginia Uncovered: The Records of Slaves and Free Blacks Listed in the City Sergeant Jail Register, 1841–1846 (Westminster, Md.: Heritage Books, 2010), 5–7, 95–98; Amos, Cotton City, 146–48; Michael W. Fitzgerald, Urban Emancipation: Popular Politics in Reconstruction Mobile, 1860–1890 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002), 12; Petitions to Become Slaves, 1860–62, Mobile County Probate Court, Archives and Records Depart-

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