The Year's Work at the Zombie Research Center

By Edward P. Comentale; Aaron Jaffe | Go to book overview

3
Zombie Spaces

DAN HASSLER-FOREST

New York City in death was very much like New York City in life. It was
still hard to get a cab, for example. The main difference was that there
were fewer people.

Colson Whitehead, Zone One

Over the past decade the zombie has been transformed from a movie monster that appeared primarily in American underground cinema and Italian horror films to a ubiquitous trope in popular culture. Instantly recognizable to general global audiences, yet flexible enough to serve both as a legitimate monster and as the punch line to a bad joke, the figure of the mindless undead has clearly found resonance in late capitalist culture and has been connected to a wide range of concepts and ideas. In the same way that Marx and Engels related the system of industrial capitalism to the figure of the vampire, many critics have pointed out that our postindustrial obsession with zombies is no coincidence: “the nineteenth century, with its classic régime of industrial capitalism, was the age of the vampire, but the network society of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries is rather characterized by a plague of zombies” (Shaviro 282).

The rise of the zombie as what Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari have described as our culture’s “only modern myth” (Anti-Oedipus 368) has been accompanied by a simultaneous and insistent foregrounding of

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The Year's Work at the Zombie Research Center
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction- the Zombie Research Center FAQ 1
  • 1 - Zombie Psychology 59
  • 2 - Zombie Demographics 89
  • 3 - Zombie Spaces 116
  • 4 - Zombie Media 150
  • 5 - Zombie Health Care 193
  • 6 - Zombie Physiology 227
  • 7 - Zombie Performance 248
  • 8 - Zombie Race 276
  • 9 - Zombie Politics 315
  • 10 - Zombie Postfeminism 341
  • 11 - Zombie Linguistics 361
  • 12 - Zombie Arts and Letters 389
  • 13 - Zombie Philosophy 416
  • 14 - Zombie Cocktails 437
  • Afterword- Zombie Archive 465
  • Works Cited 475
  • Contributors 507
  • Index 511
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