All Poets Welcome: The Lower East Side Poetry Scene in the 1960s

By Daniel Kane | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE ALL THE POETS, WRITERS, SCHOLARS, AND READING series organizers who took the time to share their stories and ideas with me through interviews, phone calls, and e-mails: Bruce Andrews, John Ashbery, Carol Bergé, Bill Berkson, Charles Bernstein, Sara Blackburn, Jerry Bloedow, Peter Cenedella, Paul Chevigny, Tom Clark, Steven Clay, Andrei Codrescu, Clark Coolidge, Kirby Congdon, Stephen Cope, Michael Davidson, Allen DeLoach, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Marcella Durand, George Economou, Andrew Epstein, Clayton Eshleman, Steve Facey, Larry Fagin, Ed Foster, Kathleen Fraser, Ed Friedman, Lyman Gilmore, John Giorno, Peter Gizzi, Alan Golding, George Greene, David Henderson, Bob Holman, Lisa Jarnot, Hettie Jones, Pierre Joris, Robert Kelly, Kenneth Koch, David Lehman, Michael Magee, Jackson Mac Low, Theresa Maier, Gerard Malanga, Jack Marshall, Bernadette Mayer, Taylor Mead, Alice Notley, Rochelle Owens, Ron Padgett, Rodney Phillips, Ishmael Reed, Libby Rifkin, Jerome Rothenberg, Mark Salerno, Ed Sanders, Susan Sherman, Ron Silliman, Joel Sloman, Michael Stephens, Lorenzo Thomas, Diane Wakoski, Anne Waldman, Lewis Warsh, Eliot Weinberger, and John Wieners. Extra thanks go to those of you who gave me permission to quote from our correspondence and other archived materials. My apologies as well to anyone whose name I may have inadvertently omitted.

I am especially grateful to Carol Bergé, who was adamant in her insistence that I research and learn about the Les Deux Mégots and Le Metro reading series as precursors to the Poetry Project, and to Bob Holman, who produced an oral history of the Poetry Project and who generously let me cite his un-

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