All Poets Welcome: The Lower East Side Poetry Scene in the 1960s

By Daniel Kane | Go to book overview

Playlist for Compact Disc

See pages 291–93 for a list of sources and permissions.

1.Denise Levertov, “O Taste and See” (0:47)
St. Mark’s Church, New York City, March 20, 1967
2.Paul Blackburn, “Clickety-Clack” (3:00)
Brooklyn Civic Center, Brooklyn, New York, May 22, 1964
3.Jackson Mac Low and Anne Tardos, excerpt from “Phoneme Dance in Memoriam John Cage” (4:00)
From the compact disc Open Secrets (XI 110), Experimental Intermedia Foundation, 1993
4.David Antin, “Who Are My Friends” (3:07)
Café Le Metro, New York City, September 1, 1965
5.Jerome Rothenberg, “A Valentine, No, a Valedictory for Gertrude Stein” (0:23)
Café Le Metro, New York City, September 1, 1965
6.Armand Schwerner, selection from “The Tablets” (5:06)
St. Mark’s Church, New York City, April 6, 1966
7.Clayton Eshleman, “Notebook Entry 1968” (3:03)
St. Mark’s Church, New York City, March 4, 1968
8.Robert Creeley, “The Charm,” “A STEP,” and “KATE’S” (1:30)
St. Mark’s Church, New York City, May 17, 1967
9.Robert Kelly, Troubadour text, translated by Robert Kelly (0:42)
Café Cino, New York City, 1960
10.John Wieners, “Poem for Cocksuckers” (1:08)
Café Le Metro, New York City, 1963
11.Allen Ginsberg, “A Supermarket in California” (2:44)
Pacifica Studios, Berkeley, California, October 25, 1956. From the compact disc Holy Soul Jelly Roll, Rhino Records, 1994
12.Amiri Baraka, “A Poem Some People Will Have to Understand” (1:10)
Poetry Society of America, New York City, December 26, 1963
13.John Ashbery, “They Dream Only of America” (1:07)
Washington Square Gallery, New York City, August 23, 1964
14.John Ashbery, “Thoughts of a Young Girl” (0:40)
Washington Square Gallery, New York City, August 23, 1964
15.Frank O’Hara, “Naphtha” (1:45)
State University of New York, Buffalo, 1964

-309-

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