Golden-Silk Smoke: A History of Tobacco in China, 1550-2010

By Carol Benedict | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was written during my years of “rice and salt.” Like others who juggle the midlife distractions and delights of parenting and caregiving with the multiple demands of academia, I have at times set this project aside in favor of more immediate concerns. That I was able to produce this book during the tumult characteristic of these middle years is due largely to the encouragement and assistance of many others. I am delighted finally to have the opportunity to thank the institutions, colleagues, friends, and family members who have supported this project over its long gestation.

Financial support for the earliest phase of research was provided by the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress and the Georgetown University Graduate School. A generous fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars afforded me the precious gift of uninterrupted time to draft the initial manuscript. A series of summer grants from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service and sabbatical leave from Georgetown University allowed for revisions and insured the book’s completion.

Research was conducted in a number of libraries and I am grateful to the staff of the institutions involved, especially David Guinevere and others in the Interlibrary Loan Department of Georgetown’s Lauinger Library. Their resourceful procurement of many disparate materials afforded me the luxury of conducting research even as I met other academic obligations and addressed family needs at home. Thanks are also due to Ding Ye for vastly expanding Lauinger’s collection of digitized Asian-language sources. I also thank the staffs of the Asian Reading Room at the Library of Congress; the Harvard-Yenching Library; the East Asia Library at Stanford University; Hatcher Graduate Library at the University of Michigan; the

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