Golden-Silk Smoke: A History of Tobacco in China, 1550-2010

By Carol Benedict | Go to book overview

3
Learning to Smoke
Chinese-Style, 1644–1750

From its earliest introduction in the late Ming period to its wide dispersal in the Qing era, New World tobacco traveled in multiple directions and along myriad paths to become “Chinese.” This process of transculturation was not unique to China, of course, but occurred at roughly the same pace in other parts of Eurasia where other people were first learning to use Amerindian tobacco. As in other contexts, tobacco became indigenized in China in culturally specific ways even as it became a globalized phenomenon. Moreover, in China as elsewhere, a critical number of reasonably well-off smoking aficionados had to emerge before an integrated market for premium tobacco products could exist. This was achieved only after the practice of smoking was appropriated from below by the Han Chinese elite in the mid- to late seventeenth century.

Pipe smoking initially caught on in Chinese borderlands among those with relatively low social status. Along the southern coast, sailors and private merchants were among the first to try tobacco; on the northern frontier, soldiers, privateers, and freebooters were early smokers. The Manchu and Mongolian nobility took to the pipe quickly, as did commoners in Liaodong and eastern Mongolia. From the vantage point of the Han Chinese, however, all Mongols and Jurchens were roughand-ready frontiersmen. The Eastern Turkestanis, Chinese Muslims, Dai, Naxi, and other peoples who traded tobacco along the western frontier were perhaps even further removed from the center of “civilization” in the consciousness of Han Chinese. Tobacco use in China thus began along the fringes of the empire among those most looked down upon by Ming high society.

Tobacco was only gradually introduced into the cultural world of the Han elite. Qing bannermen and officials, many of whom were already habituated to tobacco

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Golden-Silk Smoke: A History of Tobacco in China, 1550-2010
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 335

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.