Horrors of Slavery, or, The American Tars in Tripoli

By William Ray; Hester Blum | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
Elegy

On the death of Lieutenant JAMES DECATUR, who fell August 3d, 1804,
in an action with the Tripolitan gun-boats.

Through these drear walls, where fiends horrific reign,
Chill the faint heart and rend the frantic brain!
Where, void of friends, of pleasure, food or rest,
Tormenting slavery preys upon our breast;
From yon thick squadron, whence we hope to hear
The voice of freedom charm the captive’s ear,
Sounds the sad tale, DECATUR’S name deplore,
For that young hopeful hero breathes no more!
He left, to free us from barbarian chains,
Columbia’s blooming groves and peaceful plains;
Forever sacred be those arms he wore,
The cause that mov’d him, and the barque that bore,
’Twas heav’ns own cause—’twas freedom’s injur’d name,
The love of country, and the voice of fame
Call’d forth his active marshal skill to go
Scour the wide deep and scourge the tyrant foe:
Dauntless he fights, where dying groans resound,
And thund’ring carnage roars tremendous round—
’Till heav’n beheld him with propitious eyes,
And snatch’d his kindred spirit to the skies.
When from the Turks his mangled form they bore
With glory cover’d, bath’d in streaming gore,
Bewailing his friends his ghastly wounds survey’d,
Which bid defiance to all human aid,
When life stood trembling, ling’ring in its flight,

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Horrors of Slavery, or, The American Tars in Tripoli
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.