The Things That Fly in the Night: Female Vampires in Literature of the Circum-Caribbean and African Diaspora

By Giselle Liza Anatol | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am extremely grateful to the many, many people who contributed to the writing of this book; it is by no means an individual effort. I would, however, like to acknowledge several people in particular.

For my initial inspiration, I thank Professor Inés Salazar, whose spring 1995 class on African American and Latina feminisms spawned the first version of this work in the form of a graduate seminar paper. My English 774 classes from fall 2007 and spring 2011 helped me think and rethink ideas for the book as it was in its developmental stages. Members of the “KU in KC” writing group—Tamara Falicov, Kim Warren, Ann Rowland, and Nicole Hodges-Persley—gave me invaluable advice on various parts of the manuscript. Members of the University of Kansas (KU) English Department Gender & Sexualities writing group—Dorice Elliott, Dick Eversole, Doreen Fowler, Joe Harrington, Mary Klayder, and Misty Schieberle—also provided many insightful comments on the project. Participants of KU’s Latin American & Caribbean Studies Merienda Series and the African & African American Studies Brownbag Lunch Series enthusiastically listened to preliminary talks on the project. Hannah Harris at the Spencer Museum of Art went above and beyond in helping me garner the proper rights and permissions for the fabulous cover illustration. Gerry Besson was wonderfully generous with his time, visual materials, and additional stories, many of which I lament could not make it into the book. My KU graduate research assistants, DaMaris Hill, T. Renee Harris, and Kristen Lillvis, served as super-sleuths, looking up missing page

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