The Things That Fly in the Night: Female Vampires in Literature of the Circum-Caribbean and African Diaspora

By Giselle Liza Anatol | Go to book overview

WORKS CITED

Abrahams, Roger D. Afro-American Folktales: Stories from Black Traditions in the New World. New York: Pantheon Books, 1985.

———. Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore: Three Essays on Shantying in the West Indies. Austin: U of Texas P for the American Folklore Society, 1974.

Abrahams, Roger D., and John F. Szwed, eds. After Africa: Extracts from British Travel Accounts and Journals of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries Concerning the Slaves, Their Manners, and Customs in the British West Indies. New Haven: Yale UP, 1983.

Agnant, Marie-Célie. The Book of Emma. Trans. Zilpha Ellis. Toronto: Insomniac Press, 2006.

Alexander, M. Jacqui. “Erotic Autonomy as a Politics of Decolonization: An

Anatomy of Feminist and State Practices in the Bahamas Tourist Economy.” Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures. New York: Routledge, 1997. 63–100.

———. “Not Just (Any) Body Can Be a Citizen: The Politics of Law, Sexuality and Postcoloniality in Trinidad and Tobago and the Bahamas.” Feminist Review 48 (1994): 5–23.

Anthony, Michael. Folk Tales and Fantasies. Port of Spain: Columbus Publishers, 1976.

Arata, Stephen D. “The Occidental Tourist: Dracula and the Anxiety of Reverse Colonization.” Victorian Studies (Summer 1990). Reprinted in Dracula: A Norton Critical Edition. Ed. Nina Auerbach and David J. Skal. New York: W. W. Norton, 1997. 462–70.

Auerbach, Nina. “Dracula: A Vampire of Our Own.” Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations: Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” Ed. Harold Bloom. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2003. 191–228.

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