ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I was writing this book before I knew it. In the late summer and early autumn of 2001, sometime before the World Trade Center collapsed, I was invited by David Sterritt and Mikita Brottman to join a panel on screen performance that they were going to propose to the Society of Cinema Studies, as it was still known. For some reason I will never fathom, I suggested Johnny Depp. I certainly liked his work, and perhaps fancied, along with Kemmons Wilson, the founder of Holiday Inn, “that I’m so damn normal that anything I like, everybody else is going to like too” (Halberstam 1993, 174). I hadn’t really thought about Depp, except that he was someone worth watching. David and Mikita warmed immediately to the suggestion, and I sat down to write. In the late winter of 2002, in Denver, the panel happened, in front of what turned out to be an enthused and jovial audience, many of whom shared my sense that Depp was a figure to be contended with. I am particularly grateful to David and Mikita, as well, for sharing both published and unpublished material of theirs on Johnny Depp; and to David and also to William Luhr for inviting me to presentsome of this material to the Columbia University Seminar on Cinema and Interdisciplinary Interpretation. That my musings should have become a book is due to a suggestion, made with his usual infectious good humor, by Barry Keith Grant; this is probably not the book he had in mind, but I hope it is close enough to bring pleasure.

To think of Depp at all I was led, first by the perspicacity of the editors of Cahiers du cinéma and later by the generous hospitality of Leslie Barker and Adelaide Barker Karaskas. In various ways, they made it possible for me to want to see, and then actually to see, Edward Scissorhands, which really did open the door. My dear friend and colleague Michael DeAngelis reflected my suspicion that Depp was to be taken seriously, but also moved me to a much deeper stratum of thought through his patient and meticulous analyses of star personae in Gay Fandom and Crossover Stardom and in his brilliant essay on Depp, so generously offered to me for publication in

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Johnny Depp Starts Here
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- a Trick of Light 3
  • Depp Positions 19
  • Interlude 107
  • Johnny Depp Starts Here 119
  • Depp Theory 243
  • The Image Views Himself Disappear 261
  • Works Cited and Consulted 271
  • Filmography 279
  • Credits 297
  • Index 299
  • About the Author 309
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.