To Change the World: My Years in Cuba

By Margaret Randall | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
“POETRY, LIKE BREAD,
IS FOR EVERYONE”

POTATO DIRT UNDER MY FINGERNAILS

I wanted my poems to reach those poets with whom I shared the everyday astonishments: potato dirt under my fingernails, pumpkin pudding made from sweetened condensed milk and a rare allotment of squash, tropical heat plastering shirt to skin, the ticket taker at Copelia who remembered I always ordered chocolate, even when I’d been away in Vietnam for three long months, my woman’s yearnings, disappointments, and joys. Royal palms: so familiar yet so eternally other. My life and community: so familiar, yet so eternally other.

Those close to me took the brunt and balm. My children. My partner. This latter, after Robert and I separated in 1975, and during my last five years on the island, was Antonio Castro. Antonio was a Colombian whose family had walked across to Venezuela in 1947, part of a desperate migration. His youngest brother died of hunger on that trek. Antonio was a poet and singer. He played the cuatro, a four-stringed instrument he used to accompany his passionate song. His fingers flew across the strings and sounding board, faster, faster; his rich voice soared.

Antonio had come to Cuba to care for Domingo León, a Venezuelan guerrilla commander who had been paralyzed in a gun battle some years before. I felt deeply loved by this small, intense man, but eventually found that although he tried harder than most he didn’t really understand my creative need. My poems were often beyond him.

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
To Change the World: My Years in Cuba
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents viii
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Prologue - Some Reflections before I Begin 1
  • Chapter 1 - Scarsdale to Havana 7
  • Chapter 2 - Transition 25
  • Chapter 3 - Settling in 41
  • Chapter 4 - Food, Food, Food 61
  • Chapter 5 - Ten Million Tons of Sugar and Eleven Fishermen 71
  • Chapter 6 - A Poetry Contest and a Beauty Pageant 83
  • Chapter 7 - Women and Difference 95
  • Chapter 8 - Information and Consciousness 115
  • Chapter 9 - Changing Hearts, Minds, and Law 125
  • Chapter 10 - "Poetry, like Bread, Is for Everyone" 145
  • Chapter 11 - El Quinquenio Gris 171
  • Chapter 12 - The Sandinistas 191
  • Chapter 13 - A Question of Power 217
  • Chapter 14 - Epilogue 237
  • Notes 257
  • Index 263
  • About the Author 274
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.