Wrestling with Starbucks: Conscience, Capital, Cappuccino

By Kim Fellner | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is my first. It was fun, and it was hell; but without a lot of help from a lot of people, it would have been no fun at all.

The book started out as a small article, “The Starbucks Paradox,” in ColorLines, a magazine published by the Applied Research Center. My running buddies at ARC are an inspiration. Francis Calpotura, Rinku Sen, Sonia Peña, and Gina Acebo are the best of companions at the intersection of the personal and the political. Thanks also to Tram Nguyen and to Gary Delgado, who provoked my thinking and provided space and time to write.

Without Harold Simon at the National Housing Institute, this book would be an abandoned project in my desk drawer. After I suffered early setbacks, Harold called me up and urged me on. He hooked me up with Rutgers University Press and provided some much-needed institutional support. Even though he didn’t know me well, he was a true movement colleague when I needed one.

Marlie Wasserman at Rutgers University Press has been the best of editors—kind, direct, and so smart. I’m lucky my work fell into her hands. One of Marlie’s many skills is assembling a great team, as she has done at the press. Christina Brianik, Alicia Nadkarni, Elizabeth Scarpelli, and Jeremy Wang-Iverson, among others, coddled me and my manuscript. I was also lucky to be assigned poet Dawn Potter as my copy editor. Her wise and ruthless scrutiny improved the book, and her empathy and humor eased the process. I also owe a ton to my intrepid volunteer researcher and reader Stephen A. Wood. Because I had neither a university affiliation nor money, Steve’s participation was a true gift. His sharp eyes and sharper mind honed my thinking and my prose. And thanks to Beverly Bell, who sent him my way.

-245-

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Wrestling with Starbucks: Conscience, Capital, Cappuccino
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - The Global Economy Comes Home 1
  • 1 - The Empire Strikes Gold 15
  • 2 - Running the 10-K 27
  • 3 - Banking on the Bean 47
  • 4 - Go Sell It on the Mountain 69
  • 5 - Moving Up on Eighth Street 105
  • 6 - The Cross­dressing of Coffee-Counter Culture 123
  • 7 - When Worker Met Partner 140
  • 8 - At the Global Crossroads 163
  • 9 - The View from Headquarters 186
  • 10 - Capitalism Is like Fire … 203
  • 11 - Goodness as Battleground 220
  • 12 - Bread. Roses. Coffee 236
  • Acknowledgments 245
  • Notes 249
  • Index 267
  • About the Author 285
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