Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier

By David B. Edwards | Go to book overview

Glossary

Note: This work includes stories, texts and commentaries in both Pakhtu and Afghan Persian (Dari). The majority of the words that are included in this glossary are found in both languages. In those cases where a word is unique to one or the other language, I have added the designation (P) if it is found primarily only in Pakhtu. Following each word (as it appears in the text), I have provided in parentheses a transliteration with appropriate diacritical marks. The system of transliteration used here is that employed for Persian by the International Journal of Middle East Studies. Pakhtu has several letters and sounds that are not found in Persian. These include four retroflex phonemes (indicated by ḍ, ṇ, ṛ, and ṭ) and three additional consonants (indicated by zh, kh and tz.) Pakhtu also has a complex system of endings which I have not tried to reproduce here.

adab (adab)politeness
afghaniyat (afghānīyat)the customs of Afghans
akherat (ākherat)the next world
akhund (akhūnd)religious scholar
akhundzada (akhūndzādah)son of a religious scholar
ʿalaqadari (ʿalāqadārī)rural administrative district
amir (amīr)commander, ruler, king
andiwal (anḍīwāl) (P)friend, companion
asil (asīl)genuine, pure, uncorrupted
awliya (awalīya)saints, friends of God
azad qabayel (āzād qabāyel)independent tribal area
azan (azān)call to prayer

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Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Significant Persons xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Making of Sultan Muhammad Khan 33
  • 3 - The Reign of the Iron Amir 78
  • 4 - The Lives of an Afghan Saint 126
  • 5 - Mad Mullas and Englishmen 172
  • 6 - Epilogue 220
  • Notes 235
  • Glossary 271
  • Bibliography 279
  • Index 297
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