Intimate Encounters: Filipina Women and the Remaking of Rural Japan

By Lieba Faier | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
America and Other Stories
of Filipina Migration to Japan

What kind of journey is desire that its direction is so
deceptive?

Judith Butler, Subjects of Desire

Cora, Ana, and I were sipping tea at a small coffee shop beside the highway when Cora suddenly sighed. Glancing around the restaurant’s tired interior and out the window at the nearby mountains, she explained, “I never thought that I would marry a, what do you call it, a probinsyado” (a hick, Tg.). Then she and Ana began chuckling. “You too?” Cora asked Ana in Tagalog. Ana nodded knowingly. I had heard Cora and Ana make similar comments before. During an interview at my home a few months earlier, I had asked them about their expectations for their lives when they came to Japan as entertainers in the 1980s. “I didn’t think I would wind up living in a place like this that’s really in the boonies, where there is nothing but mountains,” Ana had explained. Cora had agreed, “I never thought that I’d wind up living in the countryside. It never really crossed my mind. I couldn’t even picture it. But I also never thought that I would marry a Japanese man.”

During another interview toward the end of my stay in Central Kiso, Cora told me about her life in the Philippines and why she had decided to go to Japan as a migrant laborer. She explained that at the time, her father was unemployed and her family could afford to eat only a few days a week. Cora’s uncle had worked as a performer at resorts in Japan during the 1970s, and he had recruited and trained her to go as an entertainer. Cora had met her husband a week after coming to Central Kiso on her second six-month contract. (She had been assigned to work at a bar in the region by her promotion agency; her first six-month assignment had been in Tokyo). She ex

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intimate Encounters: Filipina Women and the Remaking of Rural Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.